Living Amongst the Fays: Rudolph Fisher’s Portrayal of Race Collision in ‘The Walls of Jericho’

Arriving into New York in 1925, Rudolph Fisher immediately became involved in the Harlem Renaissance, befriending the likes of Langston Hughes and contributing short stories to both white and Black publications, including The New Negro. Fisher published his first novel, The Walls of Jericho, in 1928, aiming to complete a challenge set by his friend…… Continue reading Living Amongst the Fays: Rudolph Fisher’s Portrayal of Race Collision in ‘The Walls of Jericho’

A Tale for the Time Being: What I Thought

This book found me. I didn’t seek it or even come across it by accident. It found me in the first year of my Master’s. It was included in the course material as an example of a rather niche, in media res novel introduction. I could have made note of the techniques used and moved…… Continue reading A Tale for the Time Being: What I Thought

The Walls of Jericho: What I Thought

Just shy by eight years, The Walls of Jericho by Rudolph Fisher was published almost a century ago. But if I hadn’t told you that, you’d have been none the wiser. Following the lives of a tiny subsection of 1920’s Black Harlem, Fisher gives us a snapshot of what it was like to be both…… Continue reading The Walls of Jericho: What I Thought

Sapiens: What I Thought

I don’t read much non-fiction. The desire to read Harari’s Sapiens stemmed from the hype that was surrounding the book when it was first released. My motive, I initially thought, was to find out what someone else considered to be the future of humankind. We’re constantly told that humans are destroying the planet at a…… Continue reading Sapiens: What I Thought

Origin: What I Thought

Have I had a major falling out with Dan Brown? I’ve been a huge fan of Brown since I started taking reading seriously – a good fifteen years ago, perhaps. It wasn’t until my late teens, early twenties, that I became a binge reader of his: seeing the dawn rise whilst polishing off one of…… Continue reading Origin: What I Thought

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine: What I Thought

‘I suppose one of the reasons we’re all able to continue to exist for our allotted span in this green and blue vale of tears is that there is always, however remote it might seem, the possibility of change.’ We tend to walk through life under the impression that most of us humans think and…… Continue reading Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine: What I Thought

Are You OK, Mama?

I like to think I have an open and honest relationship with my partner. This willingness to share, combined with my emotional Cancerian tendencies, led to me admitting that I’m concerned about my mental health now that the school holidays are here. Scared. Terrified. I had been cruising along nicely with my little nursery and…… Continue reading Are You OK, Mama?

This is Going to Hurt: What I Thought

I was an alcohol-fueled, selfish student when the junior doctors went on strike. As with many strikes, I was simply under the impression the strike was over pay or pensions. I knew I supported them, regardless of the reason, because innately – most of us – believe a doctor’s level of care is first and…… Continue reading This is Going to Hurt: What I Thought

Wrecked: What I thought

I’ve finished my first read of 2019. It only took me five months – I was reading it on and off for a few months before that, too. But that doesn’t influence what I thought of the book. Because I was focusing loads more on writing, rather than reading. So, here’s what I thought of…… Continue reading Wrecked: What I thought

Cook with me: MOIST cocoa-free chocolate cake

I already know what you’re thinking: a cocoa-free chocolate cake? No cocoa powder in your cake? How does that work? Well, my friends, one day I had no cocoa powder in my cupboard but eggs that needed using and some love in my heart. Okay, that’s silly. But I took a regular recipe for a…… Continue reading Cook with me: MOIST cocoa-free chocolate cake